Seven hour Pinhole Exposure/Tomales, California

On the trip to the Lost Coast last August I made some exposures with my 4 x 5 pinhole camera on color negative film.  I started the exposure as soon as it was mostly dark and ended it (except for a few late wakeups) as the sun rose, about seven hours.  Because I had to leave the camera out all night, mostly unattended, choosing spots was difficult.  The best of the batch is one from the deck of a hotel in downtown Tomales, a quiet little town.  I love the softness of the pinhole night image.  I love the softness of night photography in general, everything is muted and slow.  I am not interested in the  the hyper-realistic world, as seen in many apps and programs and a lot of work done at night now.  I am interested in capturing just what is out there before the camera and I relish the chance to take my time and set up the shot.  The fact that in one night,  I make one image only intrigues me.  In Seattle, in the city, it is difficult to leave a camera out all night unattended.  I am trying to let go of my fear of this and just do it.  This long exposure night work on film is for me a way to combine much of what I love about photography:  the unexpected, the use of film, pinhole photography, color, long exposures.

This image made in Tomales, is one of the seven photographs that are in the exhibition at the Bainbridge Island Art Museum, http://www.biartmuseum.org/exhibitions/twelve-years-in-the-woods-arts-studio-gallery  The show will be up until March 5th.  Two other images in the show were also made on the Lost Coast on film with the pinhole camera but the exposures were much shorter and made just as it was getting dark.  They all have the same thing in common:  a feeling that is dreamlike and unreal but very real at the same time.

 

5 thoughts on “Seven hour Pinhole Exposure/Tomales, California

  1. gregory

    Very cool! I must try it. You are right about the dreamlike quality. Almost primordial. Like it exists independent of whther we are looking. Or maybe we just figured out how to look correctly.

    Reply
    1. janet_photo Post author

      I like your comment. . Funny I went back and read it because my new portfolio, Innards is based on just that fact: that maybe all the mishaps and happy accidents and good luck are just my way of seeing. Hmm. Independent of the whether we look or not the universe is there. Light through the pinhole records the feeling of the light, over time. It is what we feel everyday.Publishing all the Innards to date soon in their own portfolio. I am curious if you will get it. All on film with pinhole. PS Hope all is well.

      Reply
      1. Gregory Reinemer

        Hi Jan, Some interesting new quantum experiments with light are showing that the properties of the photon (smallest chunk of light) are nonexistent until the photon is detected, i.e., it does not have specific properties until it is observed. Your film is that detector. And maybe what the quantum experiments are saying is that the universe is undefined until we observe it and that what we do observe is the feeling of the universe. The light is just the messenger. Are you still in the same abode?

        Reply
        1. janet_photo Post author

          Yep I am in the same abode. You should come visit. Have a lot of pinhole stuff around now, as that is primarily what I do. The light is the messenger. I love your physicist viewpoint. Are you guys still growing tulips? Must be the season.

          Reply
  2. gregory

    Let’s talk parameter spaces. What size pinhole for what situations. Can I build a bigger box? Will it help? Who develops film like this? What else do I need to know?

    Reply

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